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Guepinia helvelloides – Apricot jelly Guepinia is a genus of fungus in the Auriculariales order. It is a monotypic genus, containing the single species Guepinia helvelloides, commonly known as the apricot jelly. The fungus produces salmon-pink, ear-shaped, gelatinous fruit bodies that grow solitarily or in small tufted groups on soil, usually associated with buried rotting wood. The fruit bodies are 4–10 cm (1.6–3.9 in) tall and up to 17 cm (6.7 in)...
Calvatia gigantea – Giant Puffball Calvatia gigantea, commonly known as the giant puffball, is a puffball mushroom commonly found in meadows, fields, and deciduous forests usually in late summer and autumn. It is found in temperate areas throughout the world. All true puffballs are considered edible when  immature, but can cause digestive upset if the...
Leccinum insigne Leccinum insigne, commonly known as the aspen bolete or the aspen scaber stalk, is a species of bolete fungus in the family Boletaceae. There have been documented cases of  adverse reactions, ranging from headaches to gastrointestinal distress, which may or may not be attributed to food sensitivities alone. The specific...
Leccinum insigne
Gomphus clavatus Gomphus clavatus is commonly found in the Northern Hemisphere and in North America it's found in mountainous regions and along the west coast (during the winter). The mushroom ranges in color, with young fruiting bodies typically looking violet and progressing to tan-color as they age. It's cap is lobed and...
Panaeolus cinctulus This is a common fungus that is found throughout the world. It's cap ranges from convex and campanulate to umbonate depending on its stage of maturity. Fruiting bodies can range from 4-6cm in diameter and are typically found in grassy, well-fertilized areas. The mushroom is known to contain some psychoactive...
Cortinarius trivialis Fruiting bodies are seen in late summer, fall and even winter in warmer climates in North America. This mushroom may be toxic, however it also contains a slimy veil which makes it quite unappealing. It forms a mycorrhizal relationship with some aspen species.
Suillus lakei This species is native to North America and is often characterized by its scruffy cap and partial veil, among other attributes. S. lakei forms ecotomycorrhizal relationships with douglas fir and it's fruiting bodies can be seen in late summer and autumn.
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